Work should be
meaningful

We believe work should be life-enriching.

The Wellbeing At Work research team explores the exciting and groundbreaking topic of what makes work engaging and impactful. The majority of people work for 40 years or more. Yet, little is known about how our work lives evolve over time.  

Our research surfaces from a multidimensional understanding of the conditions that foster, or impede, positive work experiences, and the ability to be content, and flourish, in the short term, and over our lifetimes.  

Insights

Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure

Author: Shawn Achor and Michelle Gielan

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As constant travelers and parents of a 2-year-old, we sometimes fantasize about how much work we can do when one of us gets on a plane, undistracted by phones, friends, and Finding Nemo. We race to get all our ground work done: packing, going through TSA, doing a last-minute work call, calling each other, then boarding the plane. Then, when we try to have that amazing work session in flight, we get nothing done. Even worse, after refreshing our email or reading the same studies over and over, we are too exhausted when we land to soldier on with the emails that have inevitably still piled up.…

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A Crisis of Anxiety Among Aid Workers

Author: Rosalie Hughes

An idyllic Mediterranean beach in Tunisia is not usually a place of high anxiety, but that’s where I spent the worst day of my life. I hadn’t slept in three nights and called in sick to work because I could no longer think. I felt I was losing my mind and spent the day as a zombie on the beach, feeling empty and alone on the sand.

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Partners in Learning

Lilly Endowment, Inc.

The Lilly Endowment exists to support the causes of religion, education and community development, and places special emphasis to projects that benefit young people and promote leadership education and financial self-sufficiency in the nonprofit, charitable sector.
 

The Templeton Religion Trust

The John Templeton Foundation supports research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. It seeks to encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.